Introducing Our Audio Team!

We’ve been waiting a few weeks to announce this, but now it’s official: Where Shadows Slumber will have professional audio designed by Alba S. Torremocha and Noah Kellman. Please extend them a warm welcome to the team!

It would be a shame if I spent this entire announcement post blathering on instead of handing the spotlight over to them, so instead I’ll let them write their own introductions. Take it away, you two!


Hey all!

“Here we are! Finally! The last pieces of the Dream Team, reaaaaady to rock! And roll. Mostly roll, since we’re recording A LOT.

Everybody knows that sound guys are always the coolest, but let us introduce ourselves
real quick so there’s no doubt left about it.

Alba S. Torremocha (Music & Sound Design).png

Alba was expelled from Hogwarts for using her wand as a baton.

Alba S. Torremocha (Music & Sound Design) Alba comes from a highly-refined background in classical composition and orchestration. She walks around with an eyebrow raised because well, that’s what snobby classical musicians do. She studied violin for 10 years and then Classical Composition and Conducting in Europe for 4 years, with a strong focus on French orchestration techniques (hence the raised eyebrow). In the US, she won the residency of the NYU Symphony in 2016, and recently received the Elmer Bernstein Award. Her pieces have been premiered and awarded around the world, and she always makes sure everyone is aware of this at all times. Her alter ego appears under the full moon and is a kick-ass film and video game music composer. She recently collaborated with the renowned video game composer Tom Salta (Prince of Persia, Halo, Killer Instinct…) on one of his latest projects. More:


Noah Kellman (Sound Design & Music).png

Noah spits fairy dust when he’s excited. No one knows exactly why.

Noah Kellman (Sound Design & Music) Noah comes from an intensive jazz piano background. He toured the country at the Brubeck Institute while working with many jazz greats along the way. He spent year after year striving to be the best until someone finally said to him, “Your music sounds terrible and I don’t understand any of it, so it must be the best jazz I’ve ever heard!” At that point, Noah knew he was a true jazz master and he decided to pursue becoming a master of other things, including filling his medicine pouch in Horizon Zero Dawn and driving with cruise control set to 11 mph collecting rare Pokémon in NYC. But, in his glorious return to professional sound creation, Noah began creating electronic cinematic soundscapes using acoustic instruments to create strangely familiar yet unrecognizable timbres. Although he works intensively as a composer and sound designer throughout the film and game world, his pride, joy, and utter financial downfall is his independent Cinematic Post-Rock project “Nozart”, which has also garnered him attention as a songwriter, producer and performer in the Indie world. More:



We often work as a team because, as you can see, we come from very different backgrounds and, when we combine them, really cool stuff happens. Also, it’s more fun to have someone else to blame and panic with when the deadline hits your face. We first heard about Where Shadows Slumber at Play NYC. We played it and were instantly amazed, but we quickly noticed there was no music or sound design.

When we asked them about it, they said: *slo-mo, camera closeup on their lips*

‘We’re looking for a Sound Team.’

(Actual footage of the moment)

Then, a choir of angels appeared and bonded us to this sacred quest. Next thing we know, we’re recording lantern sounds in our living room.

We knew right away that Where Shadows Slumber called for an exceptionally unique sonic landscape. After discussing this in great detail with Frank and Jack, we understood that Obe’s story takes place in a world that bears some nostalgic resemblance to ours, but is actually full of creatures, inhabitants and landscapes of mysterious origin. We wanted our sounds to be surprising, alien, and yet somehow recognizable. We tried to accomplice that goal by using unconventional methods to reflect familiar creatures and landscapes. For example, in the following video of World 0, we used a combination of synthesis and acoustic flutes to create the birds throughout the atmosphere. The two types of birds function differently within the game, bringing the soundscape to life.

We also wanted to break the barrier between music and sound design. Instead of an
inanimate loop that plays over and over, we created a soundscape in which both music
and sound design breath together, affecting and changing with each other as the player makes decisions in the game. For example, different layers of music are activated (or deactivated) with the player’s progress (or backtracking) in solving the puzzle throughout the level.

Overall, Where Shadow Slumber is an exciting challenge, and we love nothing more
than helping transport the player into a completely new, beautiful and immersive world.”

-Alba & Noah


Look Forward To More Audio Updates

Jack and I are thrilled that we’re able to bring Alba and Noah aboard! Our game has been a silent vacuum for quite some time, and it gets a bit soul-crushing. Hearing the birds chirping in the Forest for the first time suddenly made the game feel alive in a way that it hasn’t since the Demo days. It really is incredible how one missing crucial piece, like the sense of sound, can cripple the experience.

Well, no longer! Look forward to more audio updates as time goes on. We’re all working on different sections of the game right now; Alba and Noah are making their way chronologically though the Worlds starting from the Forest, as Jack finishes up the game’s ending Levels and I’m somewhere in the middle doing artwork. In time, we’ll converge and show our fan(s) the combined effort of everyone’s talents working together. Until then, you’ll have to be patient!


EDIT (Sept. 26, 3:00 p.m.): A previous version of this article mistakenly contained the wrong video file showcasing the game’s audio. The video has been updated.

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More audio updates are coming in the next few months. Until then, you can find out more about our game at, ask us on Twitter (@GameRevenant),, or Twitch, and feel free to email us directly at

Dream Team

As Frank mentioned a few weeks ago, we’re getting closer and closer to the release of Where Shadows Slumber in Spring 2018, and as such, we’re going to try to take on a bit more of an active role in terms of publicizing the game. To that end, I’m going to take some time today to answer a question I’ve been asked a few times, that’s very vaguely related to the topic of publicity. “If you guys were to start another indie game development project,” they ask, “how would you want to expand your team? What skills and responsibilities would you want from your new team members?”

This is an excellent question – pursuing a decently-scaled project requires a lot of forethought and planning, and none of it is more important than designing your dream team. After all, you’re going to be working with these people for a while – so what does your dream team look like? The best way to answer this question is with experience. I’ve been working on this project on a two-person team for over two years now. What’s my dream team?


I will never cave and get Photoshop or something else “professional”!


In The Beginning…

When Frank and I first embarked on Where Shadows Slumber, we felt like we already had a pretty good team. Our personal dynamic was good, and we knew that together we had the set of skills that would be required – I would do the programming and design, and Frank would do the art and sound. Boy were we in for a rude awakening!

You see, for our first project, SkyRunner, we did the same thing. We built and released it, and it never really felt like our team had a gap in skills. It didn’t do so well, but we viewed it as a learning experience either way, so we never felt that we had failed to do anything in particular. When planning Where Shadows Slumber, we tried to do the same thing – design/programming, and art/sound. What we didn’t realize was that there was a huge gap in our skillsets. One of, if not the most important skills was something that we simply didn’t possess. We’ve been managing okay without it, but everything would be going a lot smoother if we had thought about it up front.


Where We Are Now

Before I get into the things that we don’t have, let’s talk about what we do have. We have a very lean, very agile team, with pretty strong design, artistic, and programming skills. There hasn’t really been a point when I’ve thought “man, I don’t think I’m gonna be able to implement this” or “wow, I really wish Frank were better at art” or anything. These are our strong points, and these are the things that we’ve consistently done well throughout development. I don’t think we need to do anything to improve on these skills at the moment.

On the flip side, there are a couple of areas where we are lacking. You’ll notice that I previously listed ‘sound’ as one of the tasks, but I didn’t mention it above. That’s because neither of us has any training or experience in sound design. Frank heroically took on the sound for the demo, since it sort of feels like a more artistic endeavor, but we quickly realized that we would need someone else to do the sound design for Where Shadows Slumber if we wanted it to have a real professional sound.

However, sound isn’t the thing that we were missing at the beginning. We’ve been looking for sound people, and we’re confident that we’ll be able to incorporate great sound design into the game. No, there’s something else, a huge blind spot, something that could potentially destroy us all and leave us with nothing, something that we never realized we needed, but can’t live without. There’s one more task that encompasses everything we’ve already talked about, and is perhaps more important than all of them put together.



A successful game is one that a lot of people download. The idea is that if your game is really good, people will download it. Unfortunately, this idea doesn’t always pan out – in order to get people to download your game, you need to give them some reason to. This is where a marketing and publicity expert really helps.


“Our game really speaks for itself.”

This can be a tough pill to swallow – paying someone who may literally never contribute to the actual game itself can feel pretty awful. Despite this, your publicity expert will probably end up being the most important person on your team.

Think of this person as a salesman, helping you sell your product. It doesn’t matter if you have a billion units of the best product on the market – if you don’t have someone to sell it for you, you’re not going anywhere. Infrastructure like the app stores make this a little easier, since you can publish a game yourself, but you still need someone advocating for you and getting people to download the game.

We don’t have the experience or know-how to actually do this. It seems easy – just talk to people, tell them about the game, take any chance to promote it. But the reality is much more difficult. In reality, it’s a full-time job. Talking to bloggers, reaching out to potential publishers, doing interviews, even writing blog posts, all of it adds up to a lot more work than we had anticipated.

In the same way that your game’s name is the first thing people will see about your game, any efforts you make at publicity – ads, going to shows, posts on Facebook – are going to be right up there in your first impression. Why wouldn’t you do everything you can to make sure you make the best first impression possible? It doesn’t matter how great your game is if no one feels like they want to play it!


“Doesn’t Play Well With Others”

Getting back to the question at hand – what would I take into account when picking out my DREAM TEAM?

Well, clearly, more people working on any aspect of the game means that the work will be done faster, right? While this is true, it’s also subject to diminishing returns. This means that two people doing the job will get it done faster than just one, but not twice as fast. In the same way, the third person on the job adds even less.

This effect is compounded by the fact that coordinating the implementation of a complex system is a tricky business. If I’m the only one working on my game, then I completely understand the whole system, and I know what changes I need to make and how they will affect the rest of the game. As soon as someone else is involved, we each have to coordinate all of our changes and work to understand the whole system. This overhead can slow things down quite a bit, to the point where it seems like it might be more efficient if just one person were working on it. You’d have to ask Frank, but I assume the same thing goes for coordinating artistic styles and assets.


“Alright, new guy, here’s our system. It’s really pretty simple…”

Now, it probably sounds like I’m a crotchety old programmer who refuses to change or take a second opinion on my work. I like to think that this is not the case – I work with a handful of other programmers every day at work, and we do awesome stuff. The difference is one of scale, timing, and goals:

  • Where Shadows Slumber is a small enough project that one programmer can conceive of and manage the entire system. If I were working on a bigger project, you bet I’d want more programmers, just so that we could wrap our collective head around the tasks at hand.
  • We are nearing the end of development for Where Shadows Slumber. There’s still a long time and a lot of work left, but we’re about 80% of the way through development. Bringing someone on now would require spending a lot of time bringing them up to speed. Since there’s so little time left anyways, adding another programmer might actually cost us time, rather than save it.
  • As the only programmer and head designer for Where Shadows Slumber, I think of it as my baby, my brainchild. When working on it, I have very specific ideations and goals – hiring another programmer would mean there’s another person with their own ideas and goals. If they don’t line up with my own, then we’re gonna butt heads a lot throughout development.

Hopefully these points do a good job of explaining why I’m still the only one doing any programming work on Where Shadows Slumber. If I were to start another project, these are the things I would think about when hiring a programmer.




Dreamin’ of the Dream Team

So, if it wasn’t obvious from everything above, my first addition to the team would be a professional, dedicated marketing and publicity person. Alongside that, I would want a sound designer – which, fortunately, we are actually working toward.

Those two roles, in addition to Frank and myself, would put us in a pretty good place, in my opinion. If I were to continue expanding the team, my next move would probably be to get another artist and programmer to help with the heavy lifting. The best way to avoid diminishing returns, I think, would be to divide the work into discrete parts – for instance, the art could be divided into the art for the game itself, and the cutscenes. If I were to bring on another programmer, I would want someone with expertise in graphics and aesthetics, since those are my weakest areas.

So, if you’re looking to put together your own dream team, my recommendations are to make sure that you don’t overload any one person, and to definitely, definitely not underestimate the value of a dedicated publicity expert. Otherwise you’ll end up posting blogs full of crappy MS Paint art and thinking “Eh, it’ll be fine”.


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If you want to know more about how our team is put together, or are curious about building your own dream team, feel free to contact us! You can always find out more about our game at, find us on Twitter (@GameRevenant),, or Twitch, and feel free to email us directly with any questions or feedback at

Jack Kelly is the head developer and designer for Where Shadows Slumber



We Got Interviewed By TechRaptor!

This is so exciting – we can finally show off something that’s been in the works for a few weeks now. Since PlayNYC, Robert Adams at TechRaptor has been hard at work on an interview we did in the week leading up to the event.

In it, we discuss the origins of Game Revenant, my tragic corporate backstory, the game’s art direction, our progress over the past two years, mobile vs Steam, VR, release dates, price, and why Jack is our hero.


Check out the full article here! We’ll return to our usual blogging schedule next week, but this was too cool not to share.


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Are you a member of the media? If you’d like to interview the developers, reach out to us directly! You can find out more about our game at, ask us on Twitter (@GameRevenant),, or Twitch, and feel free to email us directly at

Frank DiCola is the founder of Game Revenant and the artist for Where Shadows Slumber.

State Of The Art – August 2017

Welcome to State Of The Art, August 2017 edition! This monthly progress report is written by Frank DiCola and is focused entirely on how the game’s visuals have improved in the past month. Without further ado, let’s explore the major leaps forward we took in August!



Obe’s Feline “Friends”

This part of the update is directly tied to the cutscene discussed below, but I wanted to give it special attention just because I like how they turned out. I modeled some cats! They really only appear during a few short cutscenes during the game, but making each one took quite a long time. Here’s the Leopard:


The spots on his coat came out way better than expected, although the top of the head is a bit off.

And the Lion:


The way his mane frames his face gets me every time!

I especially like the Lion’s mane. It was a struggle to get it to look as simple as it does. I kept making overly detailed 3D hair but it just looked wrong. At one point I considered using Cloth to simulate a glorious flowing mane, but I knew Jack would probably kill me so I backed off. I ended up going with a simple cylinder with a rotated back and it just looked right as soon as I saw it. I stepped out of my comfort zone and ended up with something super cool! Throw on Jack’s shader and voila – a glorious, friendly* Lion.

Astute observers will notice a few things about these models. For simplicity, they’re actually using the humanoid torso + limbs combo that Obe uses! But the reuse doesn’t end there. The Leopard and the Lion both have the same Head model, just with a different texture. The Lion’s mane does even more to differentiate them. A+ if you noticed this without me telling you!

* Watch the cutscene.



World 2 (River)

The River World took a giant leap forward during the month of August. I’d show you a bunch of screenshots, but I made a pledge last month to show more videos of the game in action instead of just screenshots. This is part of pushing ourselves to be better – if the game doesn’t look good in video format, we need to work harder! You’ll notice of course that there’s still no sound, but we’re working on that.


The core pillars of the River’s design are its gross yellow water, jet black dirt, log wall structures, and rickety boardwalks. There’s a really cool interplay here between the water and the black foliage – it makes it look like more things are in shadow than there really are. I love how the trees look, stretching out into the water / sky. This is one of my favorite Worlds!

Enjoy the highlight reel of all five Levels in World 2, above. Don’t worry – there’s no spoilers for puzzle solutions, just a walking tour of what each Level looks like.



“Wardens” – The First Cutscene

You walk through the forest, alone and lost. You come to an intersection… which path to take? Suddenly, a Lion appears from behind the shadowy veil. To your left, a Wolf! As they bear down on you, you wonder if they are friend or foe. And what’s that sound behind you?

This cutscene is not quite 100% finished yet, but I’ve reached the point where it’s time to leave it and move on. I’m going to throw some facial animations in there, but I’d like those to coincide with sounds (roaring, laughing, screaming) so I’m avoiding it for now. Of course, as a final pass, we’ll need to add sound effects.

There are also minor touch-ups to his clothing that I need to do. I didn’t have to animate his robe or his chasuble, which was a godsend. But with automated animation comes other issues… notice how his clothing clips through his body and the ground sometimes. It’s possible to fix this – and it’s possible it won’t even be noticeable on an iPhone – but it’s one of those things you need to leave until the end of the project. Focusing all my energy on it now means neglecting the rest of the work on my plate, so it’s not an option.


Enjoy the cutscene (above) and look forward to a 100% version later, with sound!



What To Expect From September

This coming month, my first task is going to be World 3 – the Aqueduct. We’re pretty much going chronologically here, so that’s next. I’d also love to move on to World 4 – the City. The City has been started, so one Level is already basically done. Getting those two Worlds finished would be awesome! Time will tell.

I’m satisfied with how I animated the Wardens cutscene, which means I might take a break from cutscenes for now. I really just wanted to get that first proof-of-life cutscene done so our audio crew can have something to work on as a reference for how cutscenes work.

Speaking of audio, that will also be my focus this month. I won’t be working on audio per se, but I’ll be paving the way for an audio person to come in and start adding stuff. That means some light scripting and a lot of brainstorming. It’s not visual, but it counts as “aesthetic”. Maybe I should rename this monthly post State of the Aesthetic? Is greater accuracy worth wasting one of the greatest puns of all time? Surely not…


See you again in October!


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We hope you enjoyed this update about the game’s artwork. Have a question about aesthetics that wasn’t mentioned here? You can find out more about our game at, ask us on Twitter (@GameRevenant),, or Twitch, and feel free to email us directly at

Frank DiCola is the founder of Game Revenant and the artist for Where Shadows Slumber.